modern medicine embracing traditional medicine - Health Resource International West Africa (HRI)

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Wednesday, 15 August 2018

modern medicine embracing traditional medicine


We share the article below to stress the point which many members of Hifa forum made in its recent discussion on attempts around the world to bring traditional medicine into modern medicine - many members made the point that there is need to standardise traditional medicine if the attempts stand any chance of success. There is the need to define traditional medicine and how it works, if it works, side effects and complications, and replicability,  etc etc.


The article below is a Randomised Control Trial of Acupunture in the format that modern medicine recognises and accepts. Policy makers and traditional medicine practitioners, of any form of traditional medicine, should subject their practice and herbs to similar best practice procedures/assessment if they aspire to be embedded into modern medicine. 
This article shows that it can be done:  

'Original paper
Effects of dry needling on post-stroke spasticity, motor function and stability limits: a randomised clinical trial
1.     Zacarías Sánchez-Mila1
2.     Jaime Salom-Moreno2,3
3.     César Fernández-de-las-Peñas2,3

Abstract
Objective To determine the effects of inclusion of deep dry needling into a treatment session following the Bobath concept on spasticity, motor function and postural control after a stroke.
Methods 26 patients who had suffered a stroke were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: Bobath only, or Bobath plus dry needling. Both groups received a session including strengthening, stretching and reconditioning exercises following the principles of the Bobath concept. Patients in the Bobath plus dry needling group also received a single session of ultrasound-guided dry needling of the tibialis posterior. Spasticity (Modified Modified Ashworth Scale), function (Fugl-Meyer Scale) and stability limits (computerised dynamic posturography using the SMART EquiTest System) were collected before and 10 min after treatment by a blinded assessor. The parameters of the stability limits included movement velocity (MVL), maximum excursion (MXE), end-point excursion (EPE) and directional control (DCL).
Results A greater number of individuals receiving Bobath plus dry needling exhibited a decrease in spasticity after treatment (P<0.001). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that patients receiving Bobath plus dry needling exhibited greater improvements in the balance (0.8, 95% CI 0.2 to 1.4), sensory (1.7, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.7) and range of motion (3.2, 95% CI 2.0 to 4.4) domains of the Fugl-Meyer Scale than those receiving Bobath only. ANCOVA also found that subjects receiving dry needling showed a greater increase in MVL non-affected forward direction, EPE non-affected direction, MXE backward and MXE affected/non-affected, DCL backward and DCL affected backward direction, than those who did not receive it.
Conclusions The inclusion of deep dry needling into a treatment session following the Bobath concept was effective at decreasing spasticity and improving balance, range of motion and the accuracy of maintaining stability in patients who had experienced a stroke.
Trial registration number NCT02579291.                http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/acupmed-2017-011568   

Joseph Ana.
Africa Center for Clin Gov Research & Patient Safety
@ HRI West Africa Group - HRI WA
Consultants in Clinical Governance Implementation
Publisher: Health and Medical Journals 
8 Amaku Street Housing Estate, Calabar
Cross River State, Nigeria
Phone No. +234 (0) 8063600642


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